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Kojak’s Sukata black belt Charlie McDonald: “The aim is to compete as much as possible”

Kojak’s Sukata black belt Charlie McDonald: “The aim is to compete as much as possible”

Taking three medals in the advanced and black belt level in a competition is something most grapplers dream of, however Scott Pickering black belt, Charlie McDonald, was not happy with his performance despite leaving Birmingham with three medal haul..

McDonald, who has gone from white belt to black belt under his coach, fought Jack Magee in both nogi and gi competition, with the latter bringing the more success with a submission victory to secure gold.Known to be a familiar face on the circuit and one who has been found competing at every level throughout the years, The Tatami Fightwear sponsored athlete spoke at the BirminghamInternational Open.

McDonald explained his attitude towards training and competing:“The medal haul isn’t really what I wanted. I wanted triple gold to be honest. I really thought I could win the no-gi but it was a tough fight, Jack Magee is always a tough opponent. He competes a lot and when I saw him down on points I thought I could win it.“It did turn out to be a different story when we met in the gi. I prefer the gi, I like to fight in it and I knew I had more of a chance winning in that match.

Jack Magee is renowned for his tenacity on the mats and humour off it. He is a black belt under Lucio ‘Lagarto’ Rodrigues and a regular competitor at BJJ247 events, competing in Birmingham and Manchester, with further competitions planned in the calendar.

McDonald spends most evenings working on the wings of aeroplanes, but he believes his hard workin life helps him to fly when it comes to his Jiu-Jitsu.“I work through the nights” McDonald explained. “But Monday morning we train nogi, Tuesdays I’ll teach and train, Thursday is the same, Friday I can be found in Warrington at Scott’s for fight night.Saturday morning again is nogi, so between Shotton, Warrington with Scott and working, it’s pretty much a slog, with a six year old too!

“The aim is always to compete as much as possible, from white belt to black, it’s to compete as much as I can. I don’t see the point in training all week not to. Some people, that’s their thing, they don’t want to compete, for whatever reason, I don’t know. Sometimes it’s nerves and they don’t like the way it feels, which is fair enough, but if I’m slogging my guts out on the training mats, why not come and compete?

McDonald has been training around eight years and was handed his black belt last month, becoming the first of Scott ‘Kojak’ Pickering’s black belts. He dived straight in at the highest competitive level, competing in the British Open just weeks after being promoted.

“I’ve been a black belt for a couple of months now at Kojaks in Warrington and I now train at Sukata

in Shotton which I’ve been running since brown belt, around eighteen months, two years now. I’ll always be Sukata, always and I went from white belt to black belt under Scott Pickering and the Sukata banner.McDonald went on to proudly explain what he felt the day his professor tied the belt around his “I was nearly crying! I did not expect it. What happened is Scott was handing tape to me during promotions and I was putting it on the belts to make the promotions quicker. I had two stripes already on my brown belt and he gave me two more, but then he gave me a fifth stripe on my belt.I was like ‘Kojak! I’ve already got four!’ and then he pulled out a black belt and I was like ‘Jesus!’Everyone was screaming and shouting ‘Speech! Speech!’ and when I started talking I felt like I was atmy wedding. My voice was going!”